the gaping hole

gape
verb
  1. be or become wide open.
    “a large duffel bag gaped open by her feet”

We humans are incomplete beings by nature.

In the approach to acting that I teach, we talk about characters as having a “gaping hole” in themselves, in their psyches.  Not just holes, but wide, gaping holes.  And these wide, gaping holes amount to a crisis for the character who has them.

We think of there being two types of contributors to the gaping hole.  The first is called a gash.  It is an episode that occurs at a point in time that robs the character of vital stuff and contributes to the gaping hole.  In A Streetcar Named Desire, Blanche DuBois has experienced the loss of the home that has been in her family for generations, Belle Reve.  This is a gash for Blanche.  It’s a devastating loss that contributes to her gaping hole.  The same with the suicide of her husband whom she shamed for being a “degenerate”.  This is a gash that widens her gaping hole.

The other type of contributor to the gaping hole is the tumor. A tumor is a condition that a character lives with over time.  In Streetcar, Stanley Kowalski lives in New Orleans as a second class citizen: he is Polish, and has lived with being seen as a dirty immigrant or the child of immigrants all his life.  This condition of living with this second class citizen status is a tumor; it widens Stanley’s gaping hole.

The gaping hole is important because it points to the underlying objective, which is what the character will pursue to try to fill the gaping hole.  We want the underlying objective to be a “hot” need that defines the character’s motivation across different scenes.  So Blanche could pursue love to try to fill her gaping hole which was created in part by the loss of her family home and the death of her husband.  Stanley could pursue respect to try to fill the gaping hole created by living as a second-class citizen.

Characters form plans to try to harvest as much of their underlying objective as they can.  We call these plans plot objectives.  If Blanche is pursuing love, she can try to get Stella to welcome her into her home and to apologize for leaving Blanche to handle the old age of their elders on her own.  She can try to find a husband.  These are plot objectives she can pursue to try to win her underlying objective, love.  Plot objectives change as the character’s circumstances evolve, while the underlying objective remains a constant “true north” that defines the character’s priorities moment to moment.

But it all starts with the gaping hole.